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BIOGRAPHY


LINDA BRINDISI

Linda, grandnephew of the ‘900 painter Remo Brindisi, spends long summers with the Master in his House-Museum in Lido di Spina near Ferrara. She grows in the middle of painting and Italian art culture, learning, from a young age, about the great masters of painting and their painting techniques.Since she was a little girl, she cultivates painting forming in Milan, where she attends various courses including, in particular, the anthroposophic painting course according to the Rudolf Steiner method and the Closlieu painting course according to the Arno Stern method.Linda’s painting is colored, firm and in constant motion. The artist paints unique pieces using the shape of the circle, from different diameters and revisiting waste and poor materials, such as hardboard, wood, hemp, cork, fabrics, recycled papers.
She is an artist who really cares about materials and the potential that they may develop. In her performances, which take place always in different spaces, she makes people painting using surfaces that can potentially be very estensive.This is how her gigantic Rotes take form,the same Rotes that Linda carries around in Italy and abroad with the project PitturaInMovimento. With this strong and innovative project, Linda has touched with her “Drops of Color”, as the artist likes to call them, the Venice Biennale -2007, Australia in Melbourne – 2009, Spazio Oberdan in Milan with an exhibition of all the great Rotes – 2010, France – 2012, the Remo Brindisi House Museum and the ‘900 Museum in Milan – 2012; MuSe in Trento – 2013. A project PitturaInMovimento, which has already been defined in many ways: Contemporary Art, feminine Street Art, but that Linda likes to call “Painting Viva”.
Her Pictorial Assaults are now numerous, more than 44 Rote in 14 years.Her philosophy of life is: “Travelling with cans of paint cans in my backpack and a handful of wind in the pocket.”